Evaluation of Javad RTK system for use by ES Cadastral Survey

By Monte L. King Bureau of Land
Management Eastern States
Cadastral Surveyor Dec 3, 2014

The following is an evaluation and information on the new JAVAD RTK system which includes the Triumph LS (Rover), the TRIUMPH-2 (base receiver), and a 35 watt base radio (HPT435BT). I am not a geodesist or programmer so this evaluation is solely based on my personal experience as a long time/expert user of GPS. I have been testing the JAVAD setup described in this document for about 3 weeks and have been able to learn to use the RTK set with great success implementing it into my work flow. I will break the evaluation into cost benefits and performance benefits based on my testing experience.

Cost Benefits:

Performance Benefits:

There are many more bells and whistles that a user can use to streamline the process of collecting data but I believe I covered the main items that make this RTK system a very useful tool.

I will be clear that in no way am I affiliated with JAVAD company and I do/did not receive any sort of incentives for my evaluation of the RTK set. Again my opinion is solely based on my experience as an expert user of GPS equipment and in my opinion the JAVAD RTK system as described should be purchased ASAP and future purchases should consider the JAVAD company as a first resource for this type of technology.

— One last note is that I have been able to figure out the radio settings so that I can reliably/accurately run my current Rover off of the JAVAD T2 base setup while also running the LS on the same corrections. 2 rovers one base-we still can make use of the “legacy” units we still have!

Performance	Benefits The stone below was set by William Ward in 1887, during a resurvey of the South Boundary of the White Earth Indian Reservation, to perpetuate the original standard corner of sections 31 and 32 of T141NR40W, 5th P.M., Minn. The corner was originally established by Jacob Myer in 1860 during the survey of the 10th Standard Parallel. Mr. Ward recovered the 1860 post and trees and set the stone in place of the post marking the stone W.E.I.R. on the North face and notches on east and west edges. No intervening record of being recovered was located. The stone is located about 5 feet at S. 45 W. of a very old fence corner and evidence of the original NE bearing tree was recovered at record (+/- 1 link). The WEIR is obviously visible however the notches were not so easy to distinguish. Recovered by BLM-Eastern States Cadastral Survey crew on December 2, 2014.

Performance	Benefits
I will be clear that in no way am I affiliated with JAVAD company and I do/did not receive any sort of incentives for my evaluation of the RTK set. Again my opinion is solely based on my experience as an expert user of GPS equipment.